Hematologist

When I told my family doctor about all of the blood work and results from the reproductive immunologist, I think he was in shock, just as I was when I heard it all. I mean it really is shocking to hear. You have autoimmune issues, anti thyroid antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, anti cardiolipin antibodies, antiphospholipid antibodies, scleroderma antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, a high natural killer cell count and MTHFR. (Not to mention a history of Lyme disease, endometriosis and infertility) the main goal is that my homocysteine level stays normal. So far, so good. My doctor just said I should see a hematologist. I was referred to a hematologist in another large practice and was too impatient to wait for an appointment with that one. After all, time was ticking away. So, I saw a different doctor (there is usually a reason why another doctor is always free). They first take blood and send you back into the waiting room. Then you go down a long hallway and wait inthe exam room for a long time and finally an assistant comes in and asks the same questions as the doctor. I did like one assistant, maybe she was a Nurse practitioner, I told her everything about the immune tests for the reproductive immunologist. She had a friend who did IVIG transfusion and was able to carry a baby to term. In fact that child was 2. The hematologist’s assistant told me to see a rheumatologist to see if they would prescribe an immunoglobulin infusion that may help me get pregnant. Then the hematologist came in. She’s very fashionable and well groomed and dressed like she’s modeling. This had me worried. She listened a little to what I was saying, had a difficult time trying to open documents in the computer. All the blood work gets scanned into it. We finally finished my first appointment. She wanted more blood work and that I take baby aspirin everyday and to come back in 3 weeks. When I went back, she told me that she wanted me to start on Folbic, it adds extra folic acid and vitamin B, and that I didn’t need to take baby aspirin. I told her I took prenatal vitamins and they have extra folic acid and vitamins. She said to take both. Naturally, this upset my stomach terribly. I called up and they said to come in again. I had stopped taking the baby aspirin and the Folbic. I was told my vitamin D level was 12! Normal is between 40-50. I needed a lot more sun. We all do, so I added vitamin D to my regimen. I went back in again and was put in a room with the computer screen on and someone else’s medical information right there in front of me. The table wasn’t clean. The assistant came in to take my blood pressure and asked me to sit up there, I refused until he cleaned it and put a new sheet of that white wax like paper on it. That’s when I told him my name and gestured towards the computer, boy was he embarrassed, after all, he put me in there. The hematologist came in the room and she asks me how I am doing with the baby aspirin. What!? Yes, she forgot she told me to stop it. Then preceded to tell me that some studies show that it helps when it’s taken prior to IVF and some studies say it doesn’t work. So there I was confused and I really think she was as well. Finally she said to just take the prenatal and if I get pregnant to take the Folbic and baby aspirin. Done. I’m looking for a new hematologist in the future. Naturally, when you have a large practice like that, you are not allowed to switch doctors.

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About our last embryo

I have Endometriosis, Adenomyosis and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. I've had Lyme, Bell's Palsy and the Shingles before I was 25. I've done IVF twice, with and without immunosuppression and FET. I am married to my best friend and I am Infertile.
This entry was posted in endometriosis awareness, invisible illness, reproductive immunology and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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